Pictures Galore

Some foil arts and crafts. The one on the bottom left area with “Why” on it is actually a recreation of a book cover. I swear at first I thought it was some kind of educational book about science or something, but it appears to be nothing more than a popular comic book tons of my kids read.

Various recreations of famous paintings.

This is the last Van Gogh, I swear.

What’s cooler than a guitarist jamming with a saxophonist? Jamming with a saxophonist and fire.

Let’s play Find the Foreigners.

This ajumeoni (polite term for an older woman, like ma’am or Mrs.) was down on the track celebrating every Korean feat. Unfortunately, there weren’t many, so she generally had to settle for the fact that a South Korean touched the ball.

Action shot! Angelina shooting through the hula hoop on the way to a glorious Seagull 1 win.

The unfortunate Seagull 2 team. Just can’t compete.

A rare moment of calm during the day when the kids were listening to quiz questions at the station next to mine.

Saturday I met up with Esther around 3 PM, then took a short subway and bus ride to Wolmido. It’s not actually an island, but it’s right on the ocean. It’s like half historical Korean stuff and half Coney Island.

A traditional Korean kitchen. On the right under the black lids is the stove. When lit, it would actually heat the floors in the rest of the house. Now I understand why all the floors here are heated. It’s not just a comfort thing, it’s traditional.

Now, back in the States, as a kid, the see saw was one of my favorite playground piece of equipment. However, I wouldn’t go near a Korean see saw. They’re not to be sat on; that would be too safe. Instead, Korean see saws are meant to be stood on, and you jump up and down to launch the other person upwards. I’ve seen things on TV where little 8 year old girls were launching each other like 15 feet in the air. Absolutely insane.

A traditional Korean board game. Instead of dice, one threw sticks to land either up or down, which awarded you points to move your piece around the board.

I’ll continue to post pictures gradually. I don’t want to say a whole lot about the rest of Wolmido, because I’d rather let the pictures speak for themselves. It was a good time though. One thing I can talk about, since it never dawned on me to take a picture of was this one really upset Korean man. He was late fifties and wearing a full business suit and sitting on these rocks near the water. Esther noted he was crying, then a couple minutes later, he took off his shoes and coat and threw them away. They didn’t quite make it to the water, so he retrieved them and put them back on, but decided he didn’t need his umbrella anymore and threw it into the ocean.

He then proceeded to sing really loudly and badly for maybe twenty minutes. He left for awhile, then came back and was just screaming non-stop. Esther and I were sitting there talking and kind of half-watching him. I asked what he was going on about a couple times, but she said it was really hard to tell because it didn’t make sense. She said that he was really drunk (not a surprise) and he was preaching about the Bible and St. Peter and Jesus and how people should “wake up”.

Unfortunately, I missed the last bus to Cheonan, so I had to take a bus to a nearby city, then ride the subway three stops to get home. As soon as I left the station, it started absolutely pouring. I waited in line for a cab with no umbrella for maybe two minutes and got soaked. Almost as soon as I got in, the rain really let up and completely stopped by the time I got out in Yawoori like five minutes later. Just my luck.

Played some pool with James (sucked of course, I can’t break out of this slump), drank some beers and watched the World Cup. A slow Saturday night. Tonight I’m meeting up with the Sunday group to study Korean, go out to dinner, then we’re going to Ruth’s to watch a movie.

Lastly, the pictures of my World Cup get-up:

Andrew and I.

Joel in back, J, Ruth, Q, Andrew, and I.

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